They’re open!

A welcome return to life on the terraces.

The first step towards déconfinement was taken on Wednesday. Non-essentiel shops were allowed to reopen, and bars and restaurants were allowed to open their terraces and gardens. The latter are taking full advantage of this, not only cramming as many tables and chairs as they can outside their own premises, but also colonising the frontages of adjacent shops and offices. The owners of these seem quite happy with the arrangement, and it occurred to me that they might be being offered free or discounted drinks as a quid pro quo. I have emailed the owners of Café des Arts and Le Gambetta offering to put the space outside our own house at their disposal. I have yet to receive a reply, and I accept that as they are two streets away, it’s a bit of a long shot. Still, nothing ventured …

A “colonized” Rue de la Cathédrale

The municipal council are doing their bit to promote trade by nominating certain main thoroughfares as pedestrian areas between 11.00 and 19.00 (when the current curfew starts) to allow for even more seating space. They’ve also promised that they will be laying on several street shows as part of their Culture à l’air libre initiative. (I have mixed feelings about this, having narrowly avoided being run down by a unicycling juggler back in January.)

It all helps to create a very festive atmosphere, the only dampener (literally) being the spell of showery weather we have been experiencing over the last few days. I’ve got used to seeing swarms of drinkers rushing for any available cover during a sudden downpour, then returning five minutes later to wipe down their tables and chairs and carry on drinking. Luckily, the forecast is set to change after tomorrow, and we are promised a long period of warm sunny days.

Since Wednesday, Madame and I have been playing our part in revitalising the local economy. There are those who might say our efforts have been above and beyond the call of duty, but I regard that as defeatist talk. Nevertheless, I think we are both quietly relieved that today is Sunday and all the local bars are closed.

On Thursday we are heading off to Paris for a couple of days, partly just to celebrate the fact that we can do so. Another welcome sign of déconfinement is that internal travel restrictions are being eased, and the train service is slowly getting back to normal. We plan to make the most of this.

Travel between France and the UK is still too difficult to contemplate, requiring a period of quarantine both on arrival in the UK (ten days) and on returning to France (seven days). There is also a requirement to provide negative Covid test certificates on both sides of the Channel.

Incidentally, I saw this from ex-diplomat Simon Fraser on Twitter this morning: “Had to go urgently to France last week. PCR test in UK to go there cost me £120. PCR test in France to return home cost me £0.” The tests are now free at pharmacies in France, and you can even get them at the airport.

***

Changing the subject completely: I’ve never tasted Benedictine. Nor, as it turns out, has Madame. We both think it could be minty, but we may be getting it mixed up with green Chartreuse. I know crème de menthe is minty; the name is a giveaway, but I also once drank nearly a pint of the stuff at a party in Hastings (nothing else left).

Anyway. I looked up Benedictine on Wikipedia and discovered that it’s made from a mixture of 27 herbs and spices, of which 21 are publicly known. These include red berries, cinnamon, lemon balm, tea, thyme, coriander, cloves, vanilla, and nutmeg. I am no wiser as to what it tastes like, and for all I know, mint may be one of the secret ingredients.

What I did find out, and the reason for all this waffle, is the fact that the United Kingdom is a significant market for Benedictine, and much of it is consumed in the Burnley area. That’s right, Burnley. Apparently it’s a result of soldiers of the East Lancashire Regiment acquiring a taste for the drink while stationed in France during the First World War. In Burnley, Benedictine is drunk with hot water, a mixture known as ‘Benny-and-hot’. Most remarkable of all, Burnley Miners Club is reputedly the largest single customer of the liqueur in the UK.

Now, Burnley may not have a lot going for it. Not an obvious holiday destination, and a football team whose style of play is quite a long way from that of Barcelona or Bayern Munich. But from now on, whenever I hear its name, I will mentally raise a glass to its Miners Club members and their sophisticated taste in cocktails.

***

Other things I’ve learnt this week:

Gambrinous means ‘being full of beer’.

In the USA, ransom payments to kidnappers are tax-deductible.

Enid Blyton liked to play tennis in the nude.

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